Whiteford (pronounced whitford) Point Lighthouse is situated at the end of Whiteford Point in the Burry Estuary on the Gower Peninsular. Built in 1865 and decommissioned as long ago as 1921 it is the last remaining cast iron wave-swept lighthouse in Britain. Visiting the lighthouse entails a 3 mile walk through Cwm Ivy woods and then the pine woodland and sand dunes of Whiteford Burrows, finally following the tide out over the seemingly endless blue mussel beds that can be seen in the foreground. A totally worthwhile 6 mile round trip though with wild horses roaming the dunes as well as thousands of seabirds including cormorants and many varieties of gulls to be seen. The persistent wind blowing in from the sea made it very difficult to keep the tripod steady but at least it did blow most of the grey cloud cover away. I waited until a bank of cloud was level with the lighthouse gallery and I think it looks as if the long extinguished beam is shining towards nearby Llanelli.

Whiteford (pronounced whitford) Point Lighthouse is situated at the end of Whiteford Point in the Burry Estuary on the Gower Peninsular.

Built in 1865 and decommissioned as long ago as 1921 it is the last remaining cast iron wave-swept lighthouse in Britain.
Visiting the lighthouse entails a 3 mile walk  through Cwm Ivy woods and then the pine woodland and sand dunes of Whiteford Burrows, finally following the tide out over the seemingly endless blue mussel beds that can be seen in the foreground. A totally worthwhile 6 mile round trip though with wild horses roaming the dunes as well as thousands of seabirds including cormorants and many varieties of gulls to be seen.
The persistent wind blowing in from the sea made it very difficult to keep the tripod steady but at least it did blow most of the grey cloud cover away. I waited until a bank of cloud was level with the lighthouse gallery and I think it looks as if the long extinguished beam is shining towards nearby Llanelli.